Tag Archives: oxford

The Esoteric Alphabet – Introduction part 2

Roman Lesions and the March on our Minds

One letter style would come to dominate the world’s mass communications in all matters: the Roman style.

Latin did not always use capital letters. During the reign of Emperor Constantine (312-337CE) a smaller and more quickly written form called uncials gained favour for everyday use. (The Greeks had been using a similar system since about 3BCE.)

Circa 600CE Church missionaries short-measured us again when they introduced the Roman half uncial to Britain. These were modified and used as the Irish half uncial to write the “Book of Kells” on the sacred Isle of Iona.
A slight variation, called the English half uncial, became a favourite in the north of England, notably in Lindisfarne (Holy Island), where it charmed the script for the “Lindisfarne Gospels”. These were both constructed for in-house use and based on the same principles of design.

In 754, a right handy document to the Shadow forces of the Darkness popped up: the ‘Donation of Constantine’, supposedly dating from Constantine’s propitious conversion to Christianity in 312. Although it has since been decried as a crock the DC enabled the Pope to swan around in Constantine’s symbols and regalia (so subliminally hold his power). The Donation served its purpose and the Dark agenda moved inexorably onwards.

On the heels of the conjured ‘Document of Constantine’ the Roman Catholic Church introduced yet another script style. This one involved another key player in the Roman Church, Charlemagne (768-814), King of the Franks – earnestly.

In 789 Charlemagne brought an English monk, called Alcium of York, to Reims, where the Carolingian Miniscule script emerged. (My source pronounced it ‘Alcium’ but you’ll find him as Alcuin’: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcuin) It was Alcium who developed punctuation marks (commas – COMAS etc) and first created the writing system we use today, making the first letter in a SENTENCE a capital, with the smaller letters following in a string. Charlemagne ordered the Carolignian script to be used throughout the Holy Roman Empire.

Alcium established a college under Charlemagne, well not literally under him – where unwitting minds were overshadowed and trained to expand the Dark cause.

I am quite intrigued with old Alcium’s name. There seems to have been two possibilities for its origin. The first one was a Jewish High Priest during the Maccabean revolt in Judea, 2nd century BCE, who executed 60 scoundrels who had the cheek to heckle him. The other concerns a pair of transvestite gods called the Alci. There is not much known about them, but what we do know is passed down to us by the 1st century Roman historian Tacitus who got wind of their story in Germany. Tacitus reckoned that the Alci twins were a version of the Roman gods Castor and Pollux – I said Pollux. These are another version of the twins of the Zodiac – Gemini – whose planet is Mercury, the governor of writing, the mind, and intellectual matters – and a snitch. Seems rather coincidental to me. Perhaps Alcium’s name was really Albert Shuffleyabum-Sideways, but he thought that Alcium had more of a certain je ne sais quoi to it.

eyeAlthough at first there were some books produced with calligraphic print in England, the Roman style became the overwhelming favourite after it was introduced by John Day in 1572. Printing presses sprung up (and down) all over the country but they became concentrated in London and of course the premier hub of the Dark agenda’s programming system, Oxford.

With the introduction of the printing press into Blighty during the late 1400s, the pace forged ahead. King James VI of Scotland, a Freemason, married the thrones of Scotland and England when he was crowned James I in 1603. In 1611, (Oxford’s) Wadham College’s Invisible College set loose the ‘Authorised King James Bible’, but it must have been translated (and modified) long before. Come 1627, their master encryptor and translator, Francis Bacon, was egging up the concept of a world university and obsequiously being used to gather useful kids to (as it turned out) put through their indoctrination schemes, when he published his work, ‘The New Atlantis’. Not long after this the press gang’s mass media would begin to come into its own.

Continue to part 3

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A School in the marshes

I can’t believe that it was 7 years ago today that I wrote this…but it was.  I’m re-posting this from my former website, Otherworld Journeys thanks to Ellis Nelson. She jogged my memory with her post, ‘Alice was a real girl‘.

 

A School in the marshes

ZZZZZZssssssssss! CRACK! Like a god’s new arrow the lightning bolt slew through the rolling black sky to strike at a sultry willow tree half submerged in the turbulent morass. A huddled figure, drenched, leapt from the hide-bound willow vessel wrapped the sinew cord around a withy branch and scrambled up the bank. Soon the boy was out of the rain…but not out of danger.

Continue reading A School in the marshes

In These Signs Conquer Review by Ben Fairhall

Ben Fairhall is a writer, a researcher and a theologian.

 

Ellis Taylor: Renaissance Man

51rZ721MBsL._SL250_The quest for ‘intelligent conspiracy’ can be a long and, at times, frustrating one. It is usually the Builders to whom are attributed such mighty gifts; which is one reason why (in typically perverse fashion) I often find myself reluctantly roaring them on. The Milton effect. Your typical theorist, on the other hand, with his hastily knocked off atonal screeds, more often embodies the opposite extreme. There is a conspicuous deficit of stylists in conspiracyville, or so it seems to me; and until the shortfall is rectified the tin-foil stereotype will continue to be deserved.

Fortunately, in Ellis Taylor, we have a writer for whom words have retained their wonder. Words have always been more than a medium for a message; in the right hands- as Ellis well knows- they cast a powerful spell. His spelling may be suspect, but his powers as a magician are greatly in evidence in his latest book, In These Signs Conquer. There are very few writers who would dare (or wish) to use a word like ‘flibbertigibbet’ or coin neologisms as evocative as gloomered. But language, and the multitude of ways it is wielded to control us, is a major and recurring theme. In renewing our acquaintance with the apparently familiar, discovering new dimensions with which to communicate our unique experiences, we are handed an extremely efficacious tool of resistance. This is why a significant part of the book is given over to deconstructing word-forms into component syllables (sybils) and arriving at (occasionally questionable) etymologies. We are being invited to reclaim our divine language; and with it, our divine power.

Sadly, these lofty aspirations do not preclude infrequent bouts of punning upon which Richard Whiteley- were he alive- would be hard pressed to improve. Whether this is a compliment or not I will leave the reader to judge. ‘Moloch King Tyre’- with its McCartney inspired cadence – may be esoterically appropriate; but ‘Mousetique’ (for Mustique) is criminal.

Words, of course, are not the only signs we have been conquered by. Numbers, too, have been divorced from their magical culture and have instead become agents in the exclusive service of l’argent. Hence the book’s many numerological riffs; one in particular of exceptional quality, an analysis of the occult and numerological significance of 9/11 or 911. The political chicanery behind this ritualistic event has been systematically exposed since that terrible day; and adopted as a liturgy by an entire community of ‘9/11 Truthers.’ But a growing body of researchers are now attempting to penetrate into what is surely the most vital aspect of all: its symbolic resonance, and this part of the book will be greatly drawn upon (and possibly plagiarised) in years to come. (For examples of this trend, see Phil Gardiner’s website and the essay 9/11 and the Occult, contributed by Asif Husain; and the excellent ‘synchro-mysticism’ of Jake Kotze.) What will possibly irritate some is that Ellis apportions no blame for this bloody event to any human agency, whether American or Afghan. It is, instead, merely another manifestation- a particularly visceral and catalytic one- of an ongoing agenda of domination by a force he terms the Darkness Invisible.

This notion has certain surface parallels with the inter-dimensional conspiracy theories popularised by David Icke (and latterly, Matthew Delooze.) Unlike those writers, however, he does not insist that this force assume a single, given form. Although the famed reptiles make a brief appearance, it is clear that the Darkness can, and does, ‘manifest to minds in any shape it desires depending on what reaction it seeks to evoke.’ Moreover, rather worryingly perhaps, its principal vehicle is via human possession; and this needn’t be the exclusive preserve of the despised ‘Illuminati’ either. Indeed, according to Taylor, we have all, at some time or another, been its witting or unwitting servants. Whilst the degree rituals of Freemasonry may put people within the Darkness’s corrosive grasp, equally at risk are those debunkers and demonisers for whom anything Masonic is the great Satan.

If this sounds a little hard-going, which in parts it is, behind the punning exterior and the conversational tone there is a complete occult philosophy being communicated: which revolves around the great, endless battle of Light and Dark. Whilst the Darkness, in astrological terms, is represented as Saturn and the host of Moloch and Jehovah-related deities who have been similarly conflated, the opposing principle- the Goddess- is prefigured as Venus. The struggle between these energies has been recorded in myth, legend, story and art: several such examples are summarily decoded. This reaches its apogee with a brilliant analysis of Leonardo’s The Last Supper which, if true, manages in a few pages to supersede the fruits of five hundred years of scholarship. Owing a certain amount to Lewis Da Costa’s The Secret Diaries of an Alchemist, the new revelations will be greeted with disappointment by Dan Brown devotees. The painting’s anamolies are subjected not to a literalist revisionism, which depends upon genealogical survival for their validity, but are interpreted spritually: as astro-theological signs and wonders. According to this analysis, the painting contains an accurate scientific record of the heavens and human origins, and a portent of the great destiny of mankind at the end of the age of Pisces.

Such erudition leaves Taylor in danger of attracting the attention of the academy; an outcome which no self-respecting conspiraloon would envy. The same goes for his discovery of a hidden gnostic thread in the fifteenth century painting of Mary Magdalene by Francesco di Franchesci. A twinned, mirrored version of this image forms the book’s front cover (see the image above)- which reveals an artfully concealed demon and other grotesques. Sadly, the detail of the image has failed to fully translate to the printed form; perhaps the author will rectify this by linking to a large-scale reproduction from his excellent website? It is a stunning find which has already piqued the interest of the Ashmolean Museum where the original is presently exhibited. It adds to the sum of our knowledge of late Medieval art and provides support to the idea, so popular in ‘pseudo-historical’ circles, of artists concealing heresies. To the ranks of Poussin, Teniers, Leonardo and Costeau we can add another name.

It is the Venus material, however, which I suspect will be of greatest interest to his readers. It incorporates descriptions of many of the most famous sacred sites in Britain, and in particular those within easy reach of his home county of Oxfordshire. Hence, in one particularly breezy section, we are transported to the magnificent White Horse of Uffington, a Venus archetype of especial beauty, then onwards to Glastonbury Tor and Silbury. It is here that we find Ellis at his most comfortable, amongst the ‘Marian fields’ of his Blessed Isles and the pixie barrows of his Pictish (and ‘pikey’) forebears.

Michael Tsarion has described the book as ‘an easy reading manual for the True Age’ and my advice is to treat it as such. There is much to be gained from visiting as many of the locations that Ellis describes, in particular the city of Oxford which forms the spiritual backdrop to it all. This outbreak of regionalism, however- whilst understandable- might prove less attractive for non-domestic readers, who may be unfamilar with many of the cited places. If possible, however, I would urge readers to take the trouble to engage with the material in as active a fashion as possible. So much more does the spirit of the Goddess reside in these places than in even the most inspired prose, and there is where we may begin to attune ourselves to Her song.

Ben Fairhall
http://ben-fairhall.blogspot.com

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Dogged Days Review by Ben Emlyn-Jones

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Ben Emlyn-Jones and Ann Andrews

Ben Emlyn-Jones is a writer, broadcaster and researcher.

 

From the moment I first encountered the work of Ellis Taylor I knew that the world was not the place I previously thought it was. For many years now he has been compassionately and courageously sharing his remarkable life story in his books and articles and Dogged Days is the most recent instalment in that epic tale. Ellis is an Australian-born paranormal researcher, author, lecturer, hypnotherapist and numerologist. He lives in Perth, Australia and Oxford and you can usually see him at conferences and study events all over the world. This is how I first met him: he’s a Probe Buddy. You can read my report on his latest Probe lecture here: http://hpanwo.blogspot.com/2008/10/uk-probe-conference-october-08.html

51ATeq-0vzL._SL250_Ellis describes himself as an “otherworld traveller” and throughout his life he has spent time experiencing a world that is normally hidden from view behind the screen that demarcates the universe that we know as “Reality”. Modern Conformist Western Logical Materialism constantly tells us (sometimes with a twinge of desperation!) that “Reality” is all that exists and there is nothing beyond it, but this is not true. I too have had first-hand experience of phenomena beyond the veil, but not as extreme as Ellis’. Ellis says on the blurb of the book: “We’re informed that humans who come forward to recount their contact with other worlds and beings are merely chasing glory or making… money. Well let me tell you that there is little or no money in the field and there is certainly no glory.” And I’d go as far as to say that it’s worse than merely “no glory”. Anyone who speaks out about encounters like Ellis’ is made a laughing-stock and few people are willing to brave that. Ellis should therefore be congratulated for this reason alone. I wonder how many other people have had similar experiences to Ellis but dare not talk about them.

I live in Oxford too and, although I’d never originally met Ellis in my hometown, his work has made me look at the city in a different light and encouraged me to do my own research and make my own discoveries; see here: http://hpanwo.blogspot.com/2007/08/illuminati-architecture-in-oxford.html . The history of this ancient and fascinating city, like all history, exists on two levels: the official and the folk. It is in the folk history that the true revelations can be found and a surprising amount of it has been discovered through otherworld journeys like Ellis’. Hauntings, ghosts, intuitive revelation, secret chambers and passageways and underhand plots.

Ellis has been having these experiences his whole life. As a small baby he remembers seeing “the men” in his bedroom, “men” who are not human and in fact not any creature of our world. He’s discovered marks on his body that cannot be explained and severe pain that has no obvious cause. He’s suffered from missing time on many occasions in his life. In the book he explains how this happened when he was driving near the town of North Walsham in Norfolk. He decided to break his journey to make a phone call, pulled up in a layby and saw a lorry parked in front of him. On the side of the vehicle was the word “REPCO”, and that came back to him later when he saw a TV documentary on the Moors Murderers which featured a vehicle with the same word on it. After a while he continued his journey, went down a road and came to a no-entry sign that he’d not seen before. He slammed on his brakes and almost collided with the cars behind him. Eventually when he arrived at his destination he had a few hours missing time! Clearly something strange happened to him in that lay-by and it wouldn’t be the first time. To this day he can’t recall what it was; although this might be possible one day with hypnosis. Oddly enough the place where Ellis’ experience took place was very near the base of the old Sandringham Company of the Norfolk Regiment, an entire army unit that mysteriously vanished while fighting at Gallipoli in 1915. The fact that he was reminded of this “REPCO” van on such a TV programme has a special poignancy for Ellis. Part of the awareness of being an otherworld traveller concerns the true motive for some of the most terrible crimes humans ever commit: the kidnap, abuse and murder of children. They are often far more than random killings by deranged perverts. Some are highly organized and done for evil occult reasons. Dogged Days, like Ellis last book In These Signs Conquer, is at times disturbing reading, but as Ellis says: “Despite all the brickbats that come with Contact you realize that you have been privileged to catch an awesome glimpse at creation.”

One of things I like most about Ellis’ stories is that because so many occur in Oxford I can easily visit the places where they took place. Ellis cut his adult teeth in the same place I did: The Minchery Farm Country Club. It was near here where he saw a spectral figure in white. There’s a Roman road that runs through that area and it’s a hotbed of paranormal activity. I’m familiar with this district and live just round the corner from it, but the area has changed. The old Minchery Farm club has been bulldozed down and a massive sports and leisure complex has been built over the top of it centred on Oxford United’s new horseshoe-shaped stadium. Ellis points out how the fortunes of the team have declined since they moved to their new home. The former Division One (Premiership) leaders and Milk Cup winners are now skipping in and out of the bottom of the league. (In Ellis’ previous books and articles he goes into detail about the symbolism and numerology of structures like the Kassam Stadium)

Dogged Days had an effect on me that no other book has in that it triggered a forgotten, and possibly suppressed, memory of something very significant that happened to me at Green College, Oxford when I was 10 years old. Ellis says that there is a portal to the underworld beneath the college’s famous observatory tower. If you’ve got similar lacunae in your memory then the book might help you too. This could be pleasant or unpleasant, but either way it can only be enlightening.

Ellis recounts many things that have happened to him since his last book was published. He’s taken trips to the UFO conference in Nevada (See the Probe lecture report), been on TV in Ireland with Paola Harris and took a trip to a Cornish hotel where the staff appeared otherworldly and he and his companion were met by a strange art dealer. He gives his own impressions of the death of Dean Warwick at the Autumn 2006 Probe Conference, a very controversial incident that has split the Conference circuit down the middle. (Here’s what I wrote about it myself: http://hpanwo.blogspot.com/2007/08/dean-warwick.html ) The world Ellis has investigated is far from safe and sheltered. He has uncovered horrors on an abyssal level, but also great joys. One of the most moving incidents reported in the book was where he is contacted by the spirit of his recently-deceased 9-year-old niece.

Dogged Days is a book written on a human level in a simple style. It tells the story of a man like any other, someone you can identify with and sympathise with, but one who walks a tightrope suspended between this universe and others unseen that burst our lives out of the illusion that we’ve been told is the One Sole Reality. What he has experienced is real. Other people around him have witnessed some of the strangeness that he is involved in, including myself. His experiences made me laugh, they made me cry, and above all they made me wonder! Hopefully they will make you wonder too.

Ben Emlyn-Jones
http://hpanwo.blogspot.com

 

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