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The Stars Are Falling Review by Ben Fairhall

41qAiZSkOtL._SL250_The Stars Are Falling: Reasons To Believe We Are Enslaved
By The Serpent 

by Matthew Delooze

ISBN: 978-1-9057-4703-0

Matthew’s website: www.oneballradio.com

 

 

England still awaits. David Icke, for all his faults, has at least thrown the conspiracy research field wide open for any number of young pretenders. And, in his usual mercantile way, proven it can be a lucrative branch of the infotainment biz: ripe for some entrepreneurial soul to hoist a Wannabee upon. These funded felons will surely not be long in appearing; but a more noble path has been selected by the latest contender, Matthew Delooze. Though his second publication, The Stars Are Falling: Reasons To Believe We Are Enslaved By The Serpent promises interesting things to come, Arthur’s long slumber continues undisturbed.

In many ways, the book is a testament to the evil of influence. Not for nothing did those naughty punks- who come in for a bit of a kicking from Delooze, for reasons we will cover- exhort the world to KILL YOUR IDOLS. Delooze would benefit from a bit of the same. We give Wayne Rooney and his ilk the Bread and Circus treatment (quite rightly)- isn’t it time now to get our own house in order? These pesky reptilians et al have quite a lot to answer for. Ten years ago Bilderberg and the Phantom Menance was quite enough to be getting along with. Then Icke had to stick his oar in and, well, the rest is history.

How much horsepower this stuff possesses I don’t know. I know of one source who thinks we could be looking at the foundations of a new popular paradigm, though I think it highly unlikely. The reptilian agenda does alight upon vital issues, which is (indirectly) why it continues to fascinate and repel in equal measure. Not for what it gets right, but for what it discreetly occludes. Continue digging, and a splendid story will reveal itself: one whose origins lie in Sumeria; and beyond that, in Atlantis. But it lends itself not at all to pecuniary concerns; which is why David Icke’s grasp on the Grail is slippery at best. Delooze needs to be looking for serpents closer to home, in this writer’s opinion; or is that just sour blue grapes?

And why have the Ennead now been fingered as proto-Illuminists? There is certainly something shady about Zahi Hawass (rather too similar to Crowley’s Aiwass for my liking) but the Egyptian civilisation was one of the highest ever seen. Aspects of Egyptian symbology may- like the antiquities themselves- have been held to ransom ever since, but let’s not mistake the map for the territory. The same might be said of the royals. The full extent of their meddling will probably never be revealed; and yet, might not the alternatives be far worse still? The aims of the original Illuminati, according to Nesta Webster, included ‘the abolition of Monarchy and all ordered Government’; do we really want to be doing their job for them?

Despite these concerns, however, the very fact that Delooze is doing what he does deserves praise. Any assault on the homogeneity of received wisdom is valuable, even when agreement is elusive. Mind you, there are times- rare, I will concede- when the official story might just be the right one. Delooze’s expedition to the Temple of Hathor in Dendera, for example, which forms the central (Djed) pillar of the book, results in a bout of hieroglyphic eccentricity of which Von Daniken would not be ashamed. Delooze is more than prepared to take a bit of stick for his beliefs, however, and betrays a hearty contempt for ‘experts’. And on the dynamics of incarnation- and the terrible consequences of ignoring our intuition- he writes with a rare clarity that suggests there is much more still to come.

But about those punks… ‘God Save The Queen’, it would appear- the 1977 version- is far from being the vituperative republican anthem you might have taken it for. According to Delooze, whose broadest concern is with the subliminal triggers with which humanity is perpetually blasted- despite all apparent leeriness, the message is still the same: monarchy, continuity, and the maintenance of the status quo. Whether a ‘fascist regime’ or a perfect reflection of the heavens, the words still inhabit a reality in which Monarchy is God. A competing conspiracy theory, in other words, to the official one; which holds that a bout of chart-rigging prevented the Pistols from claiming a rightful number one in Jubilee Week. Live 8, too, you will be pleased to hear, gets a bit of verbal. Whether I share his conviction that the ouroborous-inspired symbol declares the ongoing dominion of the Ennead is besides the point. He highlights some extremely relevant information regarding the ritual locations selected by Geldof (and friends) and the strange timing which saw the attacks on London in the very same week.

In the final chapter he hits his stride with an excellent summary of the ongoing hypnotic trance in which humanity is mired. The final sentence is a classic, a sweet pay-off for the persevering.

 
Ben Fairhall
http://ben-fairhall.blogspot.com

 

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Journey’s In the Dreamtime Review by Ben Fairhall

513B7T4FCYL._SL250_Journey’s In the Dreamtime

by Neil Hague

Publisher: Quester Publications

Author’s website: www.neilhague.com

 

 

An emphasis on the role of the artist and the techno-shamen of the present cinema era, in fashioning, manipulating and ultimately sustaining the present status quo is perhaps the principal achievement of this major new book. Hague writes not as a critic, whose linear ‘almost hierarchical’ approach to art history comes in for a well-deserved kicking; but primarily, as an artist and self-described visionary. Is he overstating his own case when he ascribes to the artist-shaman (inseparable categories in Hague’s eyes) the role of prime mover in the formation of spiritual traditions? Perhaps. The old question comes to mind however, equally as valid in the case of art as it is about drugs (or psychedelics.) Nor, did God invent drugs, or did drugs invent God… But, did God invent art- or did art invent God? In today’s terms, did God invent Hollywood…?

The entire cosmic conspiracy can be described as the manipulation of the Weak electromagnetic force which permeates all bodies in the Universe. ‘In truth this vibration is anything other than weak, it is the all powerful creative ‘Love energy’ that can be used to reshape and heal our world.’ Celebrity culture- like all of the manipulated belief systems and sociological structures which have preceded it- is just another ruse designed to funnel this enormously powerful Force along channels favourable to the elite. The celebrity-fixated mass hypnosis which pervades our global village is the latest saturnian (Satanic) plot to pour life-force into puppets, and deny ourselves the benefit of our innate spiritual resources.

This is an unusual twist on the predator consciousness and its machinations, which offers the reader much more than merely Children of the Matrix reloaded. As Neil is fond of pointing out, however, there is always more still left to know. Hague is also clued-up to the ever-inventive twists the myth-makers will apply to keep us safely ‘externalised.’ The New Age (which gets very little airing in this volume, presumably because many other researchers have identified the movement’s symbolic links with the older theocracies) is clearly not the only prison religion of choice in today’s market. The media, sporting spectacles, fashion- yes, even celebrity culture itself- are identified as ready-to-wear designer identities just as eager to ensnare the unconscious as the overtly ‘religious‘ programmes.

The polar axis of the book rests upon an ongoing discussion between Hague, his muses and his influences over the precise ‘nature’ of the extra-terrestrial, inter-dimensional presence. What will be frustrating for the pedant is that the question never achieves full resolution; and the debate is staged thematically, discursively, rather than being hit head-on. This discursive quality makes the book a pleasurable journey for students seeking inspiration, rather than readers seeking facts. The latter, indeed, will struggle to make much headway with the material they will find here: because, in dealing with art and symbols, the material must meet the reader half-way. This takes a particular kind of reader, and seeks to advance a particular kind of thinking. Both are species in decline, the proud achievement of an occult conspiracy whose existence Neil Hague is at pains to expose.

The subject of DNA weaves in and out like… like DNA itself. We learn that the high percentage of dark matter in the universe (approximately 90 percent) can be intuitively, and ‘scientifically’, equated with the similar quantity of what the ivory-tower persuaders have dubbed our ‘junk DNA.’ (And the un-tapped capacity of the human brain.) In probing the origins of the creatures, monsters and ‘aliens’ of pre-history and the future, Hague repeatedly returns to this source. This is a matter to be hinted at, and not to be revealed: for the key to such questions lies in the mystery. My particular faculty for mystery, however, was sorely stretched at times; until, with perfect correspondence, I came across the following quotation from one of Neil Hague’s own attested inspirations:

‘There are 240,000 miles of neural threads in the human brain, enough to stretch from earth to the moon. On every micro-meter of these threads there are 250’000 units of information. This data is recorded only as pictograms, as composite images and not as words.’

[Michael Tsarion, The Subversive Use of Sacred Symbolism in the Media] www.taroscopes.com/webstream/suvideos/suvideos.html

Tsarion goes on to remark that this symbolic data consists of the entire history of evolution, ‘our phylogenetic race memory…the Universal Intelligence.’ It suddenly becomes clear that many UFO ‘sightings’ and monster folklore is the result of accessing a little more than usual of the giant spectrum of our ‘junk DNA.’ Thus we see with perfect clarity that the Kingdom of Heaven is indeed- and always was- within us. Not merely mystically, but physically… Encoded within our very cells is the intelligence of all that has ever been.

And they call this junk?

This insight also resolves the mystery of the so-called collective unconscious, much beloved of transpersonal analysts: the source of the archetypes which haunt the mind, and which find expression in a myriad of different ways. These entities dwell in the junk DNA, and are not merely symbols so much as residual memories of the recurring themes of all that has been (and all that may come?) The collective unconscious is the junk DNA, and it is collective to the extent that we are all individual recordings of everything that has preceded us.

This also brilliantly solves the SETI problem, which Hague lambasts for assuming an overly ‘tecchie’ approach to the question of ‘alien’ life. (Even inverted commas fails to compensate for the sheer idiocy of the term.) Instead of looking ‘out there’- with gizmos – Hague wants us to start looking ‘in here’: to the realm of DNA, and even to the world of microbes. Microscopes have confirmed that many insects, smaller organisms and even plant cells assume an ‘alien’, mythical- or even human- appearance up close; with the evolution of everything encoded in our genes, is it not feasible that this is the source of the growing numbers of extra-terrestrial sightings recorded each year? Recordings of ancient or futuristic epochs, contained in our own bodies, accessible through visionary states (including via psychedelics) and then thought into ‘reality’ by the laws of the hologram? If ‘tecchie’ fans (of whom there are no shortage) wish to object that this effectively denigrates all extra-terrestrials to the apparently inferior level of ‘non-physical’, Hague points out that even ‘our so-called physical reality can be shown not to be solid- nothing is!’

I would certainly concur that any quest for extra-terrestrial life (as though a quest were needed) which rests exclusively on a desire for physical evidence is a dead-end. It reminds me of the words spoken by one Jason Andrews- himself no slouch in these matters- to Louis Theroux, and quoted by the same in his book The Call of the Weird.

‘If you need physical evidence, you’re not ready to see.’

 
Ben Fairhall
http://ben-fairhall.blogspot.com

 

In These Signs Conquer Review by Ben Fairhall

Ben Fairhall is a writer, a researcher and a theologian.

 

Ellis Taylor: Renaissance Man

51rZ721MBsL._SL250_The quest for ‘intelligent conspiracy’ can be a long and, at times, frustrating one. It is usually the Builders to whom are attributed such mighty gifts; which is one reason why (in typically perverse fashion) I often find myself reluctantly roaring them on. The Milton effect. Your typical theorist, on the other hand, with his hastily knocked off atonal screeds, more often embodies the opposite extreme. There is a conspicuous deficit of stylists in conspiracyville, or so it seems to me; and until the shortfall is rectified the tin-foil stereotype will continue to be deserved.

Fortunately, in Ellis Taylor, we have a writer for whom words have retained their wonder. Words have always been more than a medium for a message; in the right hands- as Ellis well knows- they cast a powerful spell. His spelling may be suspect, but his powers as a magician are greatly in evidence in his latest book, In These Signs Conquer. There are very few writers who would dare (or wish) to use a word like ‘flibbertigibbet’ or coin neologisms as evocative as gloomered. But language, and the multitude of ways it is wielded to control us, is a major and recurring theme. In renewing our acquaintance with the apparently familiar, discovering new dimensions with which to communicate our unique experiences, we are handed an extremely efficacious tool of resistance. This is why a significant part of the book is given over to deconstructing word-forms into component syllables (sybils) and arriving at (occasionally questionable) etymologies. We are being invited to reclaim our divine language; and with it, our divine power.

Sadly, these lofty aspirations do not preclude infrequent bouts of punning upon which Richard Whiteley- were he alive- would be hard pressed to improve. Whether this is a compliment or not I will leave the reader to judge. ‘Moloch King Tyre’- with its McCartney inspired cadence – may be esoterically appropriate; but ‘Mousetique’ (for Mustique) is criminal.

Words, of course, are not the only signs we have been conquered by. Numbers, too, have been divorced from their magical culture and have instead become agents in the exclusive service of l’argent. Hence the book’s many numerological riffs; one in particular of exceptional quality, an analysis of the occult and numerological significance of 9/11 or 911. The political chicanery behind this ritualistic event has been systematically exposed since that terrible day; and adopted as a liturgy by an entire community of ‘9/11 Truthers.’ But a growing body of researchers are now attempting to penetrate into what is surely the most vital aspect of all: its symbolic resonance, and this part of the book will be greatly drawn upon (and possibly plagiarised) in years to come. (For examples of this trend, see Phil Gardiner’s website and the essay 9/11 and the Occult, contributed by Asif Husain; and the excellent ‘synchro-mysticism’ of Jake Kotze.) What will possibly irritate some is that Ellis apportions no blame for this bloody event to any human agency, whether American or Afghan. It is, instead, merely another manifestation- a particularly visceral and catalytic one- of an ongoing agenda of domination by a force he terms the Darkness Invisible.

This notion has certain surface parallels with the inter-dimensional conspiracy theories popularised by David Icke (and latterly, Matthew Delooze.) Unlike those writers, however, he does not insist that this force assume a single, given form. Although the famed reptiles make a brief appearance, it is clear that the Darkness can, and does, ‘manifest to minds in any shape it desires depending on what reaction it seeks to evoke.’ Moreover, rather worryingly perhaps, its principal vehicle is via human possession; and this needn’t be the exclusive preserve of the despised ‘Illuminati’ either. Indeed, according to Taylor, we have all, at some time or another, been its witting or unwitting servants. Whilst the degree rituals of Freemasonry may put people within the Darkness’s corrosive grasp, equally at risk are those debunkers and demonisers for whom anything Masonic is the great Satan.

If this sounds a little hard-going, which in parts it is, behind the punning exterior and the conversational tone there is a complete occult philosophy being communicated: which revolves around the great, endless battle of Light and Dark. Whilst the Darkness, in astrological terms, is represented as Saturn and the host of Moloch and Jehovah-related deities who have been similarly conflated, the opposing principle- the Goddess- is prefigured as Venus. The struggle between these energies has been recorded in myth, legend, story and art: several such examples are summarily decoded. This reaches its apogee with a brilliant analysis of Leonardo’s The Last Supper which, if true, manages in a few pages to supersede the fruits of five hundred years of scholarship. Owing a certain amount to Lewis Da Costa’s The Secret Diaries of an Alchemist, the new revelations will be greeted with disappointment by Dan Brown devotees. The painting’s anamolies are subjected not to a literalist revisionism, which depends upon genealogical survival for their validity, but are interpreted spritually: as astro-theological signs and wonders. According to this analysis, the painting contains an accurate scientific record of the heavens and human origins, and a portent of the great destiny of mankind at the end of the age of Pisces.

Such erudition leaves Taylor in danger of attracting the attention of the academy; an outcome which no self-respecting conspiraloon would envy. The same goes for his discovery of a hidden gnostic thread in the fifteenth century painting of Mary Magdalene by Francesco di Franchesci. A twinned, mirrored version of this image forms the book’s front cover (see the image above)- which reveals an artfully concealed demon and other grotesques. Sadly, the detail of the image has failed to fully translate to the printed form; perhaps the author will rectify this by linking to a large-scale reproduction from his excellent website? It is a stunning find which has already piqued the interest of the Ashmolean Museum where the original is presently exhibited. It adds to the sum of our knowledge of late Medieval art and provides support to the idea, so popular in ‘pseudo-historical’ circles, of artists concealing heresies. To the ranks of Poussin, Teniers, Leonardo and Costeau we can add another name.

It is the Venus material, however, which I suspect will be of greatest interest to his readers. It incorporates descriptions of many of the most famous sacred sites in Britain, and in particular those within easy reach of his home county of Oxfordshire. Hence, in one particularly breezy section, we are transported to the magnificent White Horse of Uffington, a Venus archetype of especial beauty, then onwards to Glastonbury Tor and Silbury. It is here that we find Ellis at his most comfortable, amongst the ‘Marian fields’ of his Blessed Isles and the pixie barrows of his Pictish (and ‘pikey’) forebears.

Michael Tsarion has described the book as ‘an easy reading manual for the True Age’ and my advice is to treat it as such. There is much to be gained from visiting as many of the locations that Ellis describes, in particular the city of Oxford which forms the spiritual backdrop to it all. This outbreak of regionalism, however- whilst understandable- might prove less attractive for non-domestic readers, who may be unfamilar with many of the cited places. If possible, however, I would urge readers to take the trouble to engage with the material in as active a fashion as possible. So much more does the spirit of the Goddess reside in these places than in even the most inspired prose, and there is where we may begin to attune ourselves to Her song.

Ben Fairhall
http://ben-fairhall.blogspot.com

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