Category Archives: Ben Emlyn-Jones

In These Signs Conquer Review by Ben Emlyn-Jones

Ben Emlyn-Jones with a couple of his novels
Ben Emlyn-Jones, with a couple of his novels

Ben Emlyn-Jones is a writer, broadcaster, and researcher.

Some people who read this might accuse me of flattery. The author is a personal acquaintance of mine and we are habitually more polite and favourable to our friends than we are to strangers, when we tend to express honest and distilled negative opinions. This is not the case with me now. Ellis wouldn’t object if his book didn’t work for me because I know that he’s a man who admires people who think and form views independently. So when I say that this book actually did work for me I’m being truthful.

51rZ721MBsL._SL250_This book is very original and fills a long-neglected niche in New-Age/conspiracy genre: a “DIY user’s manual” for anyone waking up from the Conformist Regime’s trance and questioning the conventional, repetitive notions that we are instilled with from birth. Its written in a conversational style, very spontaneous and informal. You can tell that the author has put down words straight from his own intuition, without the tedious and belittling watering down of conventional “revision”, which invariably results in a plastic piece with a fearful need for peer-acceptance. If it’s in Ellis’ heart then it’s on the paper! Ellis also loves humour and never misses an opportunity to make a joke, particularly out of “God-botherers” (zealous Christian evangelists). This light-hearted approach not only makes the book more approachable and its contents less intimidating (and some of the information could be very intimidating to the conformist mind), but it pokes fun at the reverence all authors are supposed to have for the literary establishment; the Guardian and Times book columnists etc.

This book gives the reader a view on the world from a different angle than the one you usually get. History, geography, architecture, numbers, words, time, space. All these absolutes that we are told are universal and unchangeable. All things have an underlying meaning; EG: the word “airliner” can be split into “air liner”. The two words, defined separately, give a far better understanding of what “airliner” means. A non-English speaker who encounters the word might even guess at its meaning simply by translating the words “air” and “liner”. However words also have much deeper alternative meanings. Meanings encoded, either deliberately or subconsciously by those who first coined them. These meanings can be found by making anagrams, reversing the word or warping it in some other way. EG: The word “believe” is not in this form by accident; it contains other encoded words that give us a clue to its hidden meanings. It can mean “Bel-lie-eve” Bel being the sun, eve the moon (Goddess), in other words lying about the Goddess! And this makes it no wonder that so many religions urge us to “believe”!

What applies to words applies to numbers. The author introduces us to the art of numerology, which can be very revealing. (For a full set of instructions in numerology, see Ellis’ other book “Living in the Matrix”) Numerology at first seems hard to grasp, and I’ve said this to Ellis’ face, but given time one can see that it makes good sense. The universe is a mathematical construct, as even conventional physics understands.

Some might scoff at the idea that there are hidden codes in simple things like words and numbers, but it’s not so daft if you think about what the universe is. The “Matrix” actually exists, not literally as in the movie: a set of glass bathtubs with people inside, but symbolically. It’s no wonder that there are mathematical and spiritual codes in the fabric of its body. You may think that not all the author’s interpretations are correct, but what matters is that he is giving you a different view to the one you usually get and this is the springboard to finding your own, different interpretations in your own experiences.

I heartily recommend this book to anyone who’s interested in new objectives in life and perspectives on the world we live in. The author, like Mr Keating in “Dead Poets Society”, is encouraging us to stand up on our desks and check out the classroom from a few feet higher up.

Nice work, Ellis.

Ben Emlyn-Jones
http://hpanwo.blogspot.com

 

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Dogged Days Review by Ben Emlyn-Jones

benej and annandrews300x225
Ben Emlyn-Jones and Ann Andrews

Ben Emlyn-Jones is a writer, broadcaster and researcher.

 

From the moment I first encountered the work of Ellis Taylor I knew that the world was not the place I previously thought it was. For many years now he has been compassionately and courageously sharing his remarkable life story in his books and articles and Dogged Days is the most recent instalment in that epic tale. Ellis is an Australian-born paranormal researcher, author, lecturer, hypnotherapist and numerologist. He lives in Perth, Australia and Oxford and you can usually see him at conferences and study events all over the world. This is how I first met him: he’s a Probe Buddy. You can read my report on his latest Probe lecture here: http://hpanwo.blogspot.com/2008/10/uk-probe-conference-october-08.html

51ATeq-0vzL._SL250_Ellis describes himself as an “otherworld traveller” and throughout his life he has spent time experiencing a world that is normally hidden from view behind the screen that demarcates the universe that we know as “Reality”. Modern Conformist Western Logical Materialism constantly tells us (sometimes with a twinge of desperation!) that “Reality” is all that exists and there is nothing beyond it, but this is not true. I too have had first-hand experience of phenomena beyond the veil, but not as extreme as Ellis’. Ellis says on the blurb of the book: “We’re informed that humans who come forward to recount their contact with other worlds and beings are merely chasing glory or making… money. Well let me tell you that there is little or no money in the field and there is certainly no glory.” And I’d go as far as to say that it’s worse than merely “no glory”. Anyone who speaks out about encounters like Ellis’ is made a laughing-stock and few people are willing to brave that. Ellis should therefore be congratulated for this reason alone. I wonder how many other people have had similar experiences to Ellis but dare not talk about them.

I live in Oxford too and, although I’d never originally met Ellis in my hometown, his work has made me look at the city in a different light and encouraged me to do my own research and make my own discoveries; see here: http://hpanwo.blogspot.com/2007/08/illuminati-architecture-in-oxford.html . The history of this ancient and fascinating city, like all history, exists on two levels: the official and the folk. It is in the folk history that the true revelations can be found and a surprising amount of it has been discovered through otherworld journeys like Ellis’. Hauntings, ghosts, intuitive revelation, secret chambers and passageways and underhand plots.

Ellis has been having these experiences his whole life. As a small baby he remembers seeing “the men” in his bedroom, “men” who are not human and in fact not any creature of our world. He’s discovered marks on his body that cannot be explained and severe pain that has no obvious cause. He’s suffered from missing time on many occasions in his life. In the book he explains how this happened when he was driving near the town of North Walsham in Norfolk. He decided to break his journey to make a phone call, pulled up in a layby and saw a lorry parked in front of him. On the side of the vehicle was the word “REPCO”, and that came back to him later when he saw a TV documentary on the Moors Murderers which featured a vehicle with the same word on it. After a while he continued his journey, went down a road and came to a no-entry sign that he’d not seen before. He slammed on his brakes and almost collided with the cars behind him. Eventually when he arrived at his destination he had a few hours missing time! Clearly something strange happened to him in that lay-by and it wouldn’t be the first time. To this day he can’t recall what it was; although this might be possible one day with hypnosis. Oddly enough the place where Ellis’ experience took place was very near the base of the old Sandringham Company of the Norfolk Regiment, an entire army unit that mysteriously vanished while fighting at Gallipoli in 1915. The fact that he was reminded of this “REPCO” van on such a TV programme has a special poignancy for Ellis. Part of the awareness of being an otherworld traveller concerns the true motive for some of the most terrible crimes humans ever commit: the kidnap, abuse and murder of children. They are often far more than random killings by deranged perverts. Some are highly organized and done for evil occult reasons. Dogged Days, like Ellis last book In These Signs Conquer, is at times disturbing reading, but as Ellis says: “Despite all the brickbats that come with Contact you realize that you have been privileged to catch an awesome glimpse at creation.”

One of things I like most about Ellis’ stories is that because so many occur in Oxford I can easily visit the places where they took place. Ellis cut his adult teeth in the same place I did: The Minchery Farm Country Club. It was near here where he saw a spectral figure in white. There’s a Roman road that runs through that area and it’s a hotbed of paranormal activity. I’m familiar with this district and live just round the corner from it, but the area has changed. The old Minchery Farm club has been bulldozed down and a massive sports and leisure complex has been built over the top of it centred on Oxford United’s new horseshoe-shaped stadium. Ellis points out how the fortunes of the team have declined since they moved to their new home. The former Division One (Premiership) leaders and Milk Cup winners are now skipping in and out of the bottom of the league. (In Ellis’ previous books and articles he goes into detail about the symbolism and numerology of structures like the Kassam Stadium)

Dogged Days had an effect on me that no other book has in that it triggered a forgotten, and possibly suppressed, memory of something very significant that happened to me at Green College, Oxford when I was 10 years old. Ellis says that there is a portal to the underworld beneath the college’s famous observatory tower. If you’ve got similar lacunae in your memory then the book might help you too. This could be pleasant or unpleasant, but either way it can only be enlightening.

Ellis recounts many things that have happened to him since his last book was published. He’s taken trips to the UFO conference in Nevada (See the Probe lecture report), been on TV in Ireland with Paola Harris and took a trip to a Cornish hotel where the staff appeared otherworldly and he and his companion were met by a strange art dealer. He gives his own impressions of the death of Dean Warwick at the Autumn 2006 Probe Conference, a very controversial incident that has split the Conference circuit down the middle. (Here’s what I wrote about it myself: http://hpanwo.blogspot.com/2007/08/dean-warwick.html ) The world Ellis has investigated is far from safe and sheltered. He has uncovered horrors on an abyssal level, but also great joys. One of the most moving incidents reported in the book was where he is contacted by the spirit of his recently-deceased 9-year-old niece.

Dogged Days is a book written on a human level in a simple style. It tells the story of a man like any other, someone you can identify with and sympathise with, but one who walks a tightrope suspended between this universe and others unseen that burst our lives out of the illusion that we’ve been told is the One Sole Reality. What he has experienced is real. Other people around him have witnessed some of the strangeness that he is involved in, including myself. His experiences made me laugh, they made me cry, and above all they made me wonder! Hopefully they will make you wonder too.

Ben Emlyn-Jones
http://hpanwo.blogspot.com

 

More reviews of DOGGED DAYS

All of our books are obtainable through Amazon, Barnes & Noble etc and are carried by all of the major distributors such as Ingrams in the USA, and Bertrams and Gardners in the UK.

 

 

If you enjoy and value our books and websites then please recommend them.