All posts by Ellis

About Ellis

Ellis Taylor is a West Australian born British writer and mystic. In his work he is an outspoken, acknowledged and uncompromising consciousness explorer and commentator who combines his studies and observations with insights and knowledge gained through his much-authenticated intrinsic lifetimes’ interactions with Otherworlds and the Others.

In These Signs Conquer Review by Ben Fairhall

Ben Fairhall is a writer, a researcher and a theologian.

 

Ellis Taylor: Renaissance Man

51rZ721MBsL._SL250_The quest for ‘intelligent conspiracy’ can be a long and, at times, frustrating one. It is usually the Builders to whom are attributed such mighty gifts; which is one reason why (in typically perverse fashion) I often find myself reluctantly roaring them on. The Milton effect. Your typical theorist, on the other hand, with his hastily knocked off atonal screeds, more often embodies the opposite extreme. There is a conspicuous deficit of stylists in conspiracyville, or so it seems to me; and until the shortfall is rectified the tin-foil stereotype will continue to be deserved.

Fortunately, in Ellis Taylor, we have a writer for whom words have retained their wonder. Words have always been more than a medium for a message; in the right hands- as Ellis well knows- they cast a powerful spell. His spelling may be suspect, but his powers as a magician are greatly in evidence in his latest book, In These Signs Conquer. There are very few writers who would dare (or wish) to use a word like ‘flibbertigibbet’ or coin neologisms as evocative as gloomered. But language, and the multitude of ways it is wielded to control us, is a major and recurring theme. In renewing our acquaintance with the apparently familiar, discovering new dimensions with which to communicate our unique experiences, we are handed an extremely efficacious tool of resistance. This is why a significant part of the book is given over to deconstructing word-forms into component syllables (sybils) and arriving at (occasionally questionable) etymologies. We are being invited to reclaim our divine language; and with it, our divine power.

Sadly, these lofty aspirations do not preclude infrequent bouts of punning upon which Richard Whiteley- were he alive- would be hard pressed to improve. Whether this is a compliment or not I will leave the reader to judge. ‘Moloch King Tyre’- with its McCartney inspired cadence – may be esoterically appropriate; but ‘Mousetique’ (for Mustique) is criminal.

Words, of course, are not the only signs we have been conquered by. Numbers, too, have been divorced from their magical culture and have instead become agents in the exclusive service of l’argent. Hence the book’s many numerological riffs; one in particular of exceptional quality, an analysis of the occult and numerological significance of 9/11 or 911. The political chicanery behind this ritualistic event has been systematically exposed since that terrible day; and adopted as a liturgy by an entire community of ‘9/11 Truthers.’ But a growing body of researchers are now attempting to penetrate into what is surely the most vital aspect of all: its symbolic resonance, and this part of the book will be greatly drawn upon (and possibly plagiarised) in years to come. (For examples of this trend, see Phil Gardiner’s website and the essay 9/11 and the Occult, contributed by Asif Husain; and the excellent ‘synchro-mysticism’ of Jake Kotze.) What will possibly irritate some is that Ellis apportions no blame for this bloody event to any human agency, whether American or Afghan. It is, instead, merely another manifestation- a particularly visceral and catalytic one- of an ongoing agenda of domination by a force he terms the Darkness Invisible.

This notion has certain surface parallels with the inter-dimensional conspiracy theories popularised by David Icke (and latterly, Matthew Delooze.) Unlike those writers, however, he does not insist that this force assume a single, given form. Although the famed reptiles make a brief appearance, it is clear that the Darkness can, and does, ‘manifest to minds in any shape it desires depending on what reaction it seeks to evoke.’ Moreover, rather worryingly perhaps, its principal vehicle is via human possession; and this needn’t be the exclusive preserve of the despised ‘Illuminati’ either. Indeed, according to Taylor, we have all, at some time or another, been its witting or unwitting servants. Whilst the degree rituals of Freemasonry may put people within the Darkness’s corrosive grasp, equally at risk are those debunkers and demonisers for whom anything Masonic is the great Satan.

If this sounds a little hard-going, which in parts it is, behind the punning exterior and the conversational tone there is a complete occult philosophy being communicated: which revolves around the great, endless battle of Light and Dark. Whilst the Darkness, in astrological terms, is represented as Saturn and the host of Moloch and Jehovah-related deities who have been similarly conflated, the opposing principle- the Goddess- is prefigured as Venus. The struggle between these energies has been recorded in myth, legend, story and art: several such examples are summarily decoded. This reaches its apogee with a brilliant analysis of Leonardo’s The Last Supper which, if true, manages in a few pages to supersede the fruits of five hundred years of scholarship. Owing a certain amount to Lewis Da Costa’s The Secret Diaries of an Alchemist, the new revelations will be greeted with disappointment by Dan Brown devotees. The painting’s anamolies are subjected not to a literalist revisionism, which depends upon genealogical survival for their validity, but are interpreted spritually: as astro-theological signs and wonders. According to this analysis, the painting contains an accurate scientific record of the heavens and human origins, and a portent of the great destiny of mankind at the end of the age of Pisces.

Such erudition leaves Taylor in danger of attracting the attention of the academy; an outcome which no self-respecting conspiraloon would envy. The same goes for his discovery of a hidden gnostic thread in the fifteenth century painting of Mary Magdalene by Francesco di Franchesci. A twinned, mirrored version of this image forms the book’s front cover (see the image above)- which reveals an artfully concealed demon and other grotesques. Sadly, the detail of the image has failed to fully translate to the printed form; perhaps the author will rectify this by linking to a large-scale reproduction from his excellent website? It is a stunning find which has already piqued the interest of the Ashmolean Museum where the original is presently exhibited. It adds to the sum of our knowledge of late Medieval art and provides support to the idea, so popular in ‘pseudo-historical’ circles, of artists concealing heresies. To the ranks of Poussin, Teniers, Leonardo and Costeau we can add another name.

It is the Venus material, however, which I suspect will be of greatest interest to his readers. It incorporates descriptions of many of the most famous sacred sites in Britain, and in particular those within easy reach of his home county of Oxfordshire. Hence, in one particularly breezy section, we are transported to the magnificent White Horse of Uffington, a Venus archetype of especial beauty, then onwards to Glastonbury Tor and Silbury. It is here that we find Ellis at his most comfortable, amongst the ‘Marian fields’ of his Blessed Isles and the pixie barrows of his Pictish (and ‘pikey’) forebears.

Michael Tsarion has described the book as ‘an easy reading manual for the True Age’ and my advice is to treat it as such. There is much to be gained from visiting as many of the locations that Ellis describes, in particular the city of Oxford which forms the spiritual backdrop to it all. This outbreak of regionalism, however- whilst understandable- might prove less attractive for non-domestic readers, who may be unfamilar with many of the cited places. If possible, however, I would urge readers to take the trouble to engage with the material in as active a fashion as possible. So much more does the spirit of the Goddess reside in these places than in even the most inspired prose, and there is where we may begin to attune ourselves to Her song.

Ben Fairhall
http://ben-fairhall.blogspot.com

More reviews of In These Signs Conquer

 

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In These Signs Conquer Review by Ben Emlyn-Jones

Ben Emlyn-Jones with a couple of his novels
Ben Emlyn-Jones, with a couple of his novels

Ben Emlyn-Jones is a writer, broadcaster, and researcher.

Some people who read this might accuse me of flattery. The author is a personal acquaintance of mine and we are habitually more polite and favourable to our friends than we are to strangers, when we tend to express honest and distilled negative opinions. This is not the case with me now. Ellis wouldn’t object if his book didn’t work for me because I know that he’s a man who admires people who think and form views independently. So when I say that this book actually did work for me I’m being truthful.

51rZ721MBsL._SL250_This book is very original and fills a long-neglected niche in New-Age/conspiracy genre: a “DIY user’s manual” for anyone waking up from the Conformist Regime’s trance and questioning the conventional, repetitive notions that we are instilled with from birth. Its written in a conversational style, very spontaneous and informal. You can tell that the author has put down words straight from his own intuition, without the tedious and belittling watering down of conventional “revision”, which invariably results in a plastic piece with a fearful need for peer-acceptance. If it’s in Ellis’ heart then it’s on the paper! Ellis also loves humour and never misses an opportunity to make a joke, particularly out of “God-botherers” (zealous Christian evangelists). This light-hearted approach not only makes the book more approachable and its contents less intimidating (and some of the information could be very intimidating to the conformist mind), but it pokes fun at the reverence all authors are supposed to have for the literary establishment; the Guardian and Times book columnists etc.

This book gives the reader a view on the world from a different angle than the one you usually get. History, geography, architecture, numbers, words, time, space. All these absolutes that we are told are universal and unchangeable. All things have an underlying meaning; EG: the word “airliner” can be split into “air liner”. The two words, defined separately, give a far better understanding of what “airliner” means. A non-English speaker who encounters the word might even guess at its meaning simply by translating the words “air” and “liner”. However words also have much deeper alternative meanings. Meanings encoded, either deliberately or subconsciously by those who first coined them. These meanings can be found by making anagrams, reversing the word or warping it in some other way. EG: The word “believe” is not in this form by accident; it contains other encoded words that give us a clue to its hidden meanings. It can mean “Bel-lie-eve” Bel being the sun, eve the moon (Goddess), in other words lying about the Goddess! And this makes it no wonder that so many religions urge us to “believe”!

What applies to words applies to numbers. The author introduces us to the art of numerology, which can be very revealing. (For a full set of instructions in numerology, see Ellis’ other book “Living in the Matrix”) Numerology at first seems hard to grasp, and I’ve said this to Ellis’ face, but given time one can see that it makes good sense. The universe is a mathematical construct, as even conventional physics understands.

Some might scoff at the idea that there are hidden codes in simple things like words and numbers, but it’s not so daft if you think about what the universe is. The “Matrix” actually exists, not literally as in the movie: a set of glass bathtubs with people inside, but symbolically. It’s no wonder that there are mathematical and spiritual codes in the fabric of its body. You may think that not all the author’s interpretations are correct, but what matters is that he is giving you a different view to the one you usually get and this is the springboard to finding your own, different interpretations in your own experiences.

I heartily recommend this book to anyone who’s interested in new objectives in life and perspectives on the world we live in. The author, like Mr Keating in “Dead Poets Society”, is encouraging us to stand up on our desks and check out the classroom from a few feet higher up.

Nice work, Ellis.

Ben Emlyn-Jones
http://hpanwo.blogspot.com

 

More reviews of In These Signs Conquer

 

All of our books are obtainable through Amazon, Barnes & Noble etc and are carried by all of the major distributors such as Ingrams in the USA, and Bertrams and Gardners in the UK.

 

 

If you enjoy and value our books and websites then please recommend them.

 

 

 

Dogged Days Review by Brian Allan

Brian at the Scottish Paranormal Festival 2014
Brian at the Scottish Paranormal Festival 2014

Brian Allan is a prolific author of exceptionally researched books on the paranormal and new science and a passionate and uncompromising investigator and commentator on all things mysterious. A formidable and true Elder Statesman of paranormal research.

He is the editor of the fabulous free online magazine, Phenomena: www.phenomenamagazine.co.uk

 

 

51ATeq-0vzL._SL250_From the outset I wish to emphasise that I was not solicited to write this review, but after reading what is contained in the pages of ‘Dogged Days’, the latest offering from the pen of Ellis Taylor, I felt it was the least I could do. It is not often that I have reviewed a book which simultaneously provided considerable food for thought and at the same time created no small amount of unease. This work is not only a biography, the account of Ellis’s eventful life lived alternately on opposite sides of the world, (Australia, where he was born, and the United Kingdom), but it is also the spiritual quest of a man some might regard as a shaman. Throughout his life Ellis has, normally inadvertently, encountered and grappled with many beings and entities that of necessity must fall into one of two distinct categories. Either they are entirely imaginary and owe their existence to an overactive imagination, or they inhabit what Ellis frequently describes as ‘The Otherworld’.
It is my considered opinion that they fall into the latter of the two categories mentioned above and it is here that I must declare an interest, for I too have had similar (although not identical) encounters and in addition I have had the pleasure of meeting many of the (human) characters who populate the pages of Ellis’s book. After reading this observation the reader should not therefore assume that what follows is nothing but a valueless exercise in sycophancy, for it is not, far from it. When I contacted Ellis and offered to write this review, he made it clear that above all else he wanted honesty and that is precisely what he gets, warts and all. I should make it clear that although Ellis and I both, in the main, read from the same page, we also differ slightly on many points and this is entirely as it should be. However, these differences of opinion are nothing major, but are instead the result of using slightly different contexts and frames of reference, Ellis tends to the spiritual and I to the technological, and since spirituality is but another form of technology the end results are nigh on identical.

The Style

First the style; Ellis writes with a light, sure and witty touch and his obvious passion for his subject, the paranormal in all its forms, shines through in how he presents his account. The result is a splendid ‘tour de force’ describing a life spent exploring a demon haunted universe viewed through the eyes of a visionary, and the end result is by turns matter-of-fact and absolutely terrifying but invariably absorbing. In fact it is the very intensity and non-human ‘presence’ of some of his night time encounters that make other aspects of this work seem almost pedestrian by comparison. It is no lie to say that this reviewer wonders how Ellis succeeded in retaining his sanity following some of the experiences he describes in the book. Helpfully, where applicable his sources are mentioned (and most welcome too) and are worth some ‘surfing’ in their own right for the additional details and links.

The Encounters

Taken on a personal level, what is described here by Ellis might, due to its highly personal and invasive nature, create concern for the safety and well being of the experiencer, but that aside the impressions and visions he recounts could sit entirely comfortably on either side of the ET divide, but are they ET or are they not? This single question reopens the vigorous and highly polarised debate separating the individuals who regard ETs as a unique phenomenon and the other camp who regard them as part of a much wider phenomenon involving a multidimensional reality. Fortunately, Ellis, who, I suspect, tends to the second view, provides vivid accounts, accompanied by photographs, of the marks frequently left on his body by his night ‘visitors’. They take various forms including intricate line ‘pictures’ and what appear to be finger marks clearly imprinted on his skin, they appear to have been printed using heat. Rather worryingly, some of the marks described in the book have the slightly queasy appearance of radiation burns. These could, I suppose, be dismissed as somehow self-inflicted, but for the fact that they were seen by his partner when they occurred. In addition his skin was not damaged or creased in any way and ‘creasing’ is something that frequently occurs when bed sheets leave marks on the skin. Ellis explains how his partner was obviously (and understandably) extremely upset by these events and benefited greatly from counselling. His partner also supplies her own accounts of some of the events she witnessed and these are included in the book. Interestingly, as an investigator and researcher of paranormal phenomena I had previously seen photographic images of ‘line picture’ marks like those in the book taken by others who have experienced events similar to those described by Ellis. While this is obviously not watertight corroboration or proof of anything supernatural, it does give food for thought.

The very nature of these nocturnal visits is perhaps the most alarming aspect of the book; the mere fact that ‘they’, whatever ‘they’ are, can simply appear at will whenever and wherever they want. The fact that Ellis heard a voice whisper, ‘Peace, no harm’, during these encounters is neither here nor there; ‘they’ have no right to effectively break in to someone’s home during the hours of darkness and take them (or anyone else for that matter) without explicit consent. The possible implications of these actions nor the circumstances surrounding them are not discussed in the book, but should provide the reader with much cause for speculation and concern. The book is profusely illustrated with B&W pictures showing the places and people Ellis encountered on his travels plus other aspects of what is detailed in the text. In addition to his one-on-one experiences Ellis also treats us to accounts of his visits with some of his friends and the astonishing events that occurred when he visited the homes of the Andrews family and John and Katie Pickering are almost worth the price of the book alone. The work also includes a word of warning and one that I will wholeheartedly endorse, leave Ouija boards well alone unless in the company of an experienced medium or psychic. Most of the time the messages are harmless, but occasionally the entities that communicate through them are malicious liars and the dabbler is well advised to treat them with great respect.

And Finally

How to categorise this book? No doubt it will end up among the many UFO and New Age related titles that grace the shelves of many bookstores, but in my humble opinion it does not belong there. Instead, I believe it should be on the shelves devoted to the occult and magical, because although at first sight a work impinging on Ufology, abduction and missing time, all of which are facets of the UFO legacy, in reality this is book of magic and mysticism. As I said at the start of the review, this is the story of a modern day shaman and if the truth be told shamans are magicians in all but name. If there is only one possible criticism of this excellent work it is this; the title does not do it credit, not by a long shot, the one thing missing below the main title, ‘Dogged Days’, is a small subtitle saying, ‘A Book of Wonders’, for this surely is what it is and I heartily commend it to any student of the paranormal and the occult. Here is truth and more power to your elbow Ellis.

Brian Allan, Central Scotland, March 2009
http://brianjallan-home.co.uk/

Brian Allan is a UFO/Paranormal researcher, lecturer and writer. He is the Scottish Director of Strange Phenomena Investigations (SPI UK) (Scotland) and co-director of P.E.G (Paranormal Encounter Group).

More reviews of DOGGED DAYS

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Dogged Days Review by Ben Emlyn-Jones

benej and annandrews300x225
Ben Emlyn-Jones and Ann Andrews

Ben Emlyn-Jones is a writer, broadcaster and researcher.

 

From the moment I first encountered the work of Ellis Taylor I knew that the world was not the place I previously thought it was. For many years now he has been compassionately and courageously sharing his remarkable life story in his books and articles and Dogged Days is the most recent instalment in that epic tale. Ellis is an Australian-born paranormal researcher, author, lecturer, hypnotherapist and numerologist. He lives in Perth, Australia and Oxford and you can usually see him at conferences and study events all over the world. This is how I first met him: he’s a Probe Buddy. You can read my report on his latest Probe lecture here: http://hpanwo.blogspot.com/2008/10/uk-probe-conference-october-08.html

51ATeq-0vzL._SL250_Ellis describes himself as an “otherworld traveller” and throughout his life he has spent time experiencing a world that is normally hidden from view behind the screen that demarcates the universe that we know as “Reality”. Modern Conformist Western Logical Materialism constantly tells us (sometimes with a twinge of desperation!) that “Reality” is all that exists and there is nothing beyond it, but this is not true. I too have had first-hand experience of phenomena beyond the veil, but not as extreme as Ellis’. Ellis says on the blurb of the book: “We’re informed that humans who come forward to recount their contact with other worlds and beings are merely chasing glory or making… money. Well let me tell you that there is little or no money in the field and there is certainly no glory.” And I’d go as far as to say that it’s worse than merely “no glory”. Anyone who speaks out about encounters like Ellis’ is made a laughing-stock and few people are willing to brave that. Ellis should therefore be congratulated for this reason alone. I wonder how many other people have had similar experiences to Ellis but dare not talk about them.

I live in Oxford too and, although I’d never originally met Ellis in my hometown, his work has made me look at the city in a different light and encouraged me to do my own research and make my own discoveries; see here: http://hpanwo.blogspot.com/2007/08/illuminati-architecture-in-oxford.html . The history of this ancient and fascinating city, like all history, exists on two levels: the official and the folk. It is in the folk history that the true revelations can be found and a surprising amount of it has been discovered through otherworld journeys like Ellis’. Hauntings, ghosts, intuitive revelation, secret chambers and passageways and underhand plots.

Ellis has been having these experiences his whole life. As a small baby he remembers seeing “the men” in his bedroom, “men” who are not human and in fact not any creature of our world. He’s discovered marks on his body that cannot be explained and severe pain that has no obvious cause. He’s suffered from missing time on many occasions in his life. In the book he explains how this happened when he was driving near the town of North Walsham in Norfolk. He decided to break his journey to make a phone call, pulled up in a layby and saw a lorry parked in front of him. On the side of the vehicle was the word “REPCO”, and that came back to him later when he saw a TV documentary on the Moors Murderers which featured a vehicle with the same word on it. After a while he continued his journey, went down a road and came to a no-entry sign that he’d not seen before. He slammed on his brakes and almost collided with the cars behind him. Eventually when he arrived at his destination he had a few hours missing time! Clearly something strange happened to him in that lay-by and it wouldn’t be the first time. To this day he can’t recall what it was; although this might be possible one day with hypnosis. Oddly enough the place where Ellis’ experience took place was very near the base of the old Sandringham Company of the Norfolk Regiment, an entire army unit that mysteriously vanished while fighting at Gallipoli in 1915. The fact that he was reminded of this “REPCO” van on such a TV programme has a special poignancy for Ellis. Part of the awareness of being an otherworld traveller concerns the true motive for some of the most terrible crimes humans ever commit: the kidnap, abuse and murder of children. They are often far more than random killings by deranged perverts. Some are highly organized and done for evil occult reasons. Dogged Days, like Ellis last book In These Signs Conquer, is at times disturbing reading, but as Ellis says: “Despite all the brickbats that come with Contact you realize that you have been privileged to catch an awesome glimpse at creation.”

One of things I like most about Ellis’ stories is that because so many occur in Oxford I can easily visit the places where they took place. Ellis cut his adult teeth in the same place I did: The Minchery Farm Country Club. It was near here where he saw a spectral figure in white. There’s a Roman road that runs through that area and it’s a hotbed of paranormal activity. I’m familiar with this district and live just round the corner from it, but the area has changed. The old Minchery Farm club has been bulldozed down and a massive sports and leisure complex has been built over the top of it centred on Oxford United’s new horseshoe-shaped stadium. Ellis points out how the fortunes of the team have declined since they moved to their new home. The former Division One (Premiership) leaders and Milk Cup winners are now skipping in and out of the bottom of the league. (In Ellis’ previous books and articles he goes into detail about the symbolism and numerology of structures like the Kassam Stadium)

Dogged Days had an effect on me that no other book has in that it triggered a forgotten, and possibly suppressed, memory of something very significant that happened to me at Green College, Oxford when I was 10 years old. Ellis says that there is a portal to the underworld beneath the college’s famous observatory tower. If you’ve got similar lacunae in your memory then the book might help you too. This could be pleasant or unpleasant, but either way it can only be enlightening.

Ellis recounts many things that have happened to him since his last book was published. He’s taken trips to the UFO conference in Nevada (See the Probe lecture report), been on TV in Ireland with Paola Harris and took a trip to a Cornish hotel where the staff appeared otherworldly and he and his companion were met by a strange art dealer. He gives his own impressions of the death of Dean Warwick at the Autumn 2006 Probe Conference, a very controversial incident that has split the Conference circuit down the middle. (Here’s what I wrote about it myself: http://hpanwo.blogspot.com/2007/08/dean-warwick.html ) The world Ellis has investigated is far from safe and sheltered. He has uncovered horrors on an abyssal level, but also great joys. One of the most moving incidents reported in the book was where he is contacted by the spirit of his recently-deceased 9-year-old niece.

Dogged Days is a book written on a human level in a simple style. It tells the story of a man like any other, someone you can identify with and sympathise with, but one who walks a tightrope suspended between this universe and others unseen that burst our lives out of the illusion that we’ve been told is the One Sole Reality. What he has experienced is real. Other people around him have witnessed some of the strangeness that he is involved in, including myself. His experiences made me laugh, they made me cry, and above all they made me wonder! Hopefully they will make you wonder too.

Ben Emlyn-Jones
http://hpanwo.blogspot.com

 

More reviews of DOGGED DAYS

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Dogged Days

51ATeq-0vzL._SL250_The strange life and times of a child from eternity.
Paranormal experiences with Extraterrestrials, Humans,
& Beings from other worlds
& dimensions

By Ellis Taylor

 

Cover illustration by visionary artist Neil Hague, from a sketch by Ellis Taylor.

My personal life story of true encounters with conventions’ impossibilities.

 

Author’s Note
(From the book)

I have written this book to attest and to demonstrate that interactions with other worlds and unseen realities, and of course their inhabitants, are a natural human experience; more than that they participate, as we do, in providing vital faculties for unending expression through the infinite scope and limited facets of Creation’s ambitions.

I want people who have remarkable experiences that convention denies and the orthodox scorn to know that in the great cast of Creation they are not the strange or gullible ones; that they are not alone and that what they have experienced is crucial.

I want people to believe in themselves, and the power of their own experiences. I want people to remember who they are, what they are, where they have come from and where they have been. I want them to appreciate the mysterious personal synchronicities and connections that ripple quietly, and loudly sometimes, many times every day. In every way I want them to notice their life.

To assist those who research these matters I have attempted to be as forthright as possible and to give as many personal details as I can, because it may be that such information collated from ‘experiencers’ offers them significant clues to why some of us have these so called extraordinary experiences and some do not.

Whatever your reasons are for reading this book I hope you find it informative, entertaining and inspiring. Thank you so much for being here, and for being interested.

Ellis Taylor 24th January 2009
SYDNEY

 

Read excerpts from Dogged Days here

 

Reviews of Dogged Days

 

Two versions: Colour and Black and White:
B&W ISBN: 978-0-9556861-2-2
Colour ISBN: 978-0-9550417-2-3

Direct from the author (Please, first email for availability)
B&W: 184 pages: £9.95 + £2.00 pp
Colour: 208 pages: £17.95 + £2.00 pp

90+ illustrations

 

B&W Publication date: 9th December 2008
Approx. 6″ x 9″, 184 pages plus covers.
ISBN: 978-0-9556861-2-2 Price: £9.95 + pp

Colour Publication date: 28th January 2009
Approx. 5.5″ x 8.5″, 208 pages plus covers.
ISBN: 978-0-9550417-2-3 Price: £17.95 + pp

 

A message from Ellis to independent bookshops:
Please notify us if you stock Dogged Days and your name will be included in the list below. Thank you.

These shops stock our books and also have a mail order service:
Australia

Megalong Books, Leura, New South Wales 2780
http://www.megalongbooks.com.au/

Chantique: Midland Gate Shopping Centre, Midland, Western Australia 6056. Phone: (08) 9274 8282

 

All of our books are obtainable through AMAZON, BARNES & NOBLE, FISHPOND etc and are carried by all of the major distributors such as Ingrams in the USA, and Bertrams and Gardners in the UK.

 

 

If you enjoy and value our books, then please recommend them.