Journey’s In the Dreamtime Review by Ben Fairhall

513B7T4FCYL._SL250_Journey’s In the Dreamtime

by Neil Hague

Publisher: Quester Publications

Author’s website: www.neilhague.com

 

 

An emphasis on the role of the artist and the techno-shamen of the present cinema era, in fashioning, manipulating and ultimately sustaining the present status quo is perhaps the principal achievement of this major new book. Hague writes not as a critic, whose linear ‘almost hierarchical’ approach to art history comes in for a well-deserved kicking; but primarily, as an artist and self-described visionary. Is he overstating his own case when he ascribes to the artist-shaman (inseparable categories in Hague’s eyes) the role of prime mover in the formation of spiritual traditions? Perhaps. The old question comes to mind however, equally as valid in the case of art as it is about drugs (or psychedelics.) Nor, did God invent drugs, or did drugs invent God… But, did God invent art- or did art invent God? In today’s terms, did God invent Hollywood…?

The entire cosmic conspiracy can be described as the manipulation of the Weak electromagnetic force which permeates all bodies in the Universe. ‘In truth this vibration is anything other than weak, it is the all powerful creative ‘Love energy’ that can be used to reshape and heal our world.’ Celebrity culture- like all of the manipulated belief systems and sociological structures which have preceded it- is just another ruse designed to funnel this enormously powerful Force along channels favourable to the elite. The celebrity-fixated mass hypnosis which pervades our global village is the latest saturnian (Satanic) plot to pour life-force into puppets, and deny ourselves the benefit of our innate spiritual resources.

This is an unusual twist on the predator consciousness and its machinations, which offers the reader much more than merely Children of the Matrix reloaded. As Neil is fond of pointing out, however, there is always more still left to know. Hague is also clued-up to the ever-inventive twists the myth-makers will apply to keep us safely ‘externalised.’ The New Age (which gets very little airing in this volume, presumably because many other researchers have identified the movement’s symbolic links with the older theocracies) is clearly not the only prison religion of choice in today’s market. The media, sporting spectacles, fashion- yes, even celebrity culture itself- are identified as ready-to-wear designer identities just as eager to ensnare the unconscious as the overtly ‘religious‘ programmes.

The polar axis of the book rests upon an ongoing discussion between Hague, his muses and his influences over the precise ‘nature’ of the extra-terrestrial, inter-dimensional presence. What will be frustrating for the pedant is that the question never achieves full resolution; and the debate is staged thematically, discursively, rather than being hit head-on. This discursive quality makes the book a pleasurable journey for students seeking inspiration, rather than readers seeking facts. The latter, indeed, will struggle to make much headway with the material they will find here: because, in dealing with art and symbols, the material must meet the reader half-way. This takes a particular kind of reader, and seeks to advance a particular kind of thinking. Both are species in decline, the proud achievement of an occult conspiracy whose existence Neil Hague is at pains to expose.

The subject of DNA weaves in and out like… like DNA itself. We learn that the high percentage of dark matter in the universe (approximately 90 percent) can be intuitively, and ‘scientifically’, equated with the similar quantity of what the ivory-tower persuaders have dubbed our ‘junk DNA.’ (And the un-tapped capacity of the human brain.) In probing the origins of the creatures, monsters and ‘aliens’ of pre-history and the future, Hague repeatedly returns to this source. This is a matter to be hinted at, and not to be revealed: for the key to such questions lies in the mystery. My particular faculty for mystery, however, was sorely stretched at times; until, with perfect correspondence, I came across the following quotation from one of Neil Hague’s own attested inspirations:

‘There are 240,000 miles of neural threads in the human brain, enough to stretch from earth to the moon. On every micro-meter of these threads there are 250’000 units of information. This data is recorded only as pictograms, as composite images and not as words.’

[Michael Tsarion, The Subversive Use of Sacred Symbolism in the Media] www.taroscopes.com/webstream/suvideos/suvideos.html

Tsarion goes on to remark that this symbolic data consists of the entire history of evolution, ‘our phylogenetic race memory…the Universal Intelligence.’ It suddenly becomes clear that many UFO ‘sightings’ and monster folklore is the result of accessing a little more than usual of the giant spectrum of our ‘junk DNA.’ Thus we see with perfect clarity that the Kingdom of Heaven is indeed- and always was- within us. Not merely mystically, but physically… Encoded within our very cells is the intelligence of all that has ever been.

And they call this junk?

This insight also resolves the mystery of the so-called collective unconscious, much beloved of transpersonal analysts: the source of the archetypes which haunt the mind, and which find expression in a myriad of different ways. These entities dwell in the junk DNA, and are not merely symbols so much as residual memories of the recurring themes of all that has been (and all that may come?) The collective unconscious is the junk DNA, and it is collective to the extent that we are all individual recordings of everything that has preceded us.

This also brilliantly solves the SETI problem, which Hague lambasts for assuming an overly ‘tecchie’ approach to the question of ‘alien’ life. (Even inverted commas fails to compensate for the sheer idiocy of the term.) Instead of looking ‘out there’- with gizmos – Hague wants us to start looking ‘in here’: to the realm of DNA, and even to the world of microbes. Microscopes have confirmed that many insects, smaller organisms and even plant cells assume an ‘alien’, mythical- or even human- appearance up close; with the evolution of everything encoded in our genes, is it not feasible that this is the source of the growing numbers of extra-terrestrial sightings recorded each year? Recordings of ancient or futuristic epochs, contained in our own bodies, accessible through visionary states (including via psychedelics) and then thought into ‘reality’ by the laws of the hologram? If ‘tecchie’ fans (of whom there are no shortage) wish to object that this effectively denigrates all extra-terrestrials to the apparently inferior level of ‘non-physical’, Hague points out that even ‘our so-called physical reality can be shown not to be solid- nothing is!’

I would certainly concur that any quest for extra-terrestrial life (as though a quest were needed) which rests exclusively on a desire for physical evidence is a dead-end. It reminds me of the words spoken by one Jason Andrews- himself no slouch in these matters- to Louis Theroux, and quoted by the same in his book The Call of the Weird.

‘If you need physical evidence, you’re not ready to see.’

 
Ben Fairhall
http://ben-fairhall.blogspot.com

 

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