In These Signs Conquer Review by Ben Emlyn-Jones

Ben Emlyn-Jones with a couple of his novels
Ben Emlyn-Jones, with a couple of his novels

Ben Emlyn-Jones is a writer, broadcaster, and researcher.

Some people who read this might accuse me of flattery. The author is a personal acquaintance of mine and we are habitually more polite and favourable to our friends than we are to strangers, when we tend to express honest and distilled negative opinions. This is not the case with me now. Ellis wouldn’t object if his book didn’t work for me because I know that he’s a man who admires people who think and form views independently. So when I say that this book actually did work for me I’m being truthful.

51rZ721MBsL._SL250_This book is very original and fills a long-neglected niche in New-Age/conspiracy genre: a “DIY user’s manual” for anyone waking up from the Conformist Regime’s trance and questioning the conventional, repetitive notions that we are instilled with from birth. Its written in a conversational style, very spontaneous and informal. You can tell that the author has put down words straight from his own intuition, without the tedious and belittling watering down of conventional “revision”, which invariably results in a plastic piece with a fearful need for peer-acceptance. If it’s in Ellis’ heart then it’s on the paper! Ellis also loves humour and never misses an opportunity to make a joke, particularly out of “God-botherers” (zealous Christian evangelists). This light-hearted approach not only makes the book more approachable and its contents less intimidating (and some of the information could be very intimidating to the conformist mind), but it pokes fun at the reverence all authors are supposed to have for the literary establishment; the Guardian and Times book columnists etc.

This book gives the reader a view on the world from a different angle than the one you usually get. History, geography, architecture, numbers, words, time, space. All these absolutes that we are told are universal and unchangeable. All things have an underlying meaning; EG: the word “airliner” can be split into “air liner”. The two words, defined separately, give a far better understanding of what “airliner” means. A non-English speaker who encounters the word might even guess at its meaning simply by translating the words “air” and “liner”. However words also have much deeper alternative meanings. Meanings encoded, either deliberately or subconsciously by those who first coined them. These meanings can be found by making anagrams, reversing the word or warping it in some other way. EG: The word “believe” is not in this form by accident; it contains other encoded words that give us a clue to its hidden meanings. It can mean “Bel-lie-eve” Bel being the sun, eve the moon (Goddess), in other words lying about the Goddess! And this makes it no wonder that so many religions urge us to “believe”!

What applies to words applies to numbers. The author introduces us to the art of numerology, which can be very revealing. (For a full set of instructions in numerology, see Ellis’ other book “Living in the Matrix”) Numerology at first seems hard to grasp, and I’ve said this to Ellis’ face, but given time one can see that it makes good sense. The universe is a mathematical construct, as even conventional physics understands.

Some might scoff at the idea that there are hidden codes in simple things like words and numbers, but it’s not so daft if you think about what the universe is. The “Matrix” actually exists, not literally as in the movie: a set of glass bathtubs with people inside, but symbolically. It’s no wonder that there are mathematical and spiritual codes in the fabric of its body. You may think that not all the author’s interpretations are correct, but what matters is that he is giving you a different view to the one you usually get and this is the springboard to finding your own, different interpretations in your own experiences.

I heartily recommend this book to anyone who’s interested in new objectives in life and perspectives on the world we live in. The author, like Mr Keating in “Dead Poets Society”, is encouraging us to stand up on our desks and check out the classroom from a few feet higher up.

Nice work, Ellis.

Ben Emlyn-Jones
http://hpanwo.blogspot.com

 

More reviews of In These Signs Conquer

 

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